Intermediate Training Programs: Increase Performance, Not Workload

Posted by Danny Dreyer on Tue Jun 11th, 2013, No comments (be the first!)

Intermediate Training Programs: Increase Performance, Not Workload

We often get asked how the ChiRunning® Intermediate training programs differ from the Beginner training programs.

Training Programs

The Beginner training programs are for runners who are just starting to run for the first time; those having to start from scratch whether returning from an injury, a lapse in their training, or are runners who are new to ChiRunning and have not yet felt in their bodies the benefits of good posture, a slight lean, and a midfoot strike.

When we refer to intermediate runners, we’re talking about runners who have been running long enough to feel comfortable with their running; who could run a 5K today, without having to stop and walk. These are folks who are more experienced with running and are looking to run more efficiently, faster, or farther than they are currently running. They might not be competitive runners, but they are looking to pick up the pace with their running, improve performance and deepen their ChiRunning skills.

The ChiRunning Intermediate Training Programs take you beyond the Beginning runner programs by delving deeper into technique training and race-specific training. As you graduate from learning the basics of Chi Running during the beginner phase (breathing, body sensing, all the Chi Running focuses, body looseners and stretches), you’ll change your workout schedule to reflect your need to add more variability in your conditioning and your running skills. Here are four workouts we have in the ChiRunning Intermediate Training Programs.

Interval workouts

If you’re looking for more of a competitive edge, the interval workouts are speed-training without being based on leg strength. You’ll be learning how to engage your strong core muscles while relaxing your leg muscles, instead of simply training yourself to depend on stronger legs, like most other training programs.

Hill workouts

These workouts help to build your cardiovascular conditioning. They also focus on the techniques needed to run uphills and downhills easier and faster.

Tempo runs

These workouts are a chance to feel what running, for an extended time at higher speeds, feels like. This is race-specific practice that will familiarize you with your specific course, your ideal starting pace, mid-run pace and finishing kick. It’s an approach to racing that is rarely explained in most currently available training programs.

Long Slow Distance runs

These runs train your body to increase its rate of oxygen uptake, allowing you to more easily hold a faster pace for a longer period of time. You’ll also learn the valuable skills of patience and strategy.

The Intermediate Training Programs will also give you three invaluable skills mentioned in the ChiMarathon Book:
1. Using elastic recoil to gain speed without increasing your effort
2. The use of your obliques for speed and hills
3. Using Breathwork and cadence to maximize issuing of energy

If you look closely at the total list of ingredients mentioned here, you’ll see that “no stone is left unturned,” in terms of preparing you for a race or, at the least, significantly improving your skills as a runner. The ChiRunning Intermediate Training Programs take your training far beyond speed and distance, and bring your body and mind to bear on every aspect of improving performance, giving you the skills and confidence to accomplish any of your running goals.

Get started: Take Danny's 10K Intermediate Training Webinar (starts July)
 

Tags

  • marathon training,
  • chirunning,
  • chi running,
  • long distance running,
  • training plan,
  • half marathon training program

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A message of pure gratitude as your book on Chi Running has completely changed my running experience. In only three and a half years I've gone through patellar tendonitis (in both knees), plantar fasciitis, and many other injuries I can't even describe.

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