October 2014 Blog Archive - Chi Living

Practice Makes Progress

Posted by Danny Dreyer on Mon Oct 27th, 2014, 0 comments

Lisa Pozzoni, one of our certified Chi Running instructors came up with a great line that hits the nail on the head in terms of how to approach learning, "Practice makes progress." It's a play on that old phrase that has made students of any discipline uptight for centuries. I like it because it puts the emphasis on practice instead of perfection, which we all know is infinitely elusive.

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MINDFUL MONDAY: Are you moving symmetrically when you run?

Posted by Danny Dreyer on Mon Oct 13th, 2014, 6 comments

Are you moving symmetrically when you run?  This is a tough question, but an important one to ask yourself. Our bodies are designed to work in a way where all the parts contribute to the movement of the whole. Most of these parts work in pairs: our legs, feet, arms, and all of the bilateral muscles that move our body. If one half of any of these "pairs" is not matching the movement of its "twin" your body will move in an unbalanced way, triggering nearby muscles to work harder to compensate for the imbalance.

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9 Running Myths

Posted by Danny Dreyer on Thu Oct 9th, 2014, 9 comments

There's a ton of information out there about running - from training to speed to shoes, and the list goes on. Some of it's helpful, but some advice will just trip you up. We wrote this week's blog, "9 Running Myths", to help you weed through it all so you can be a happier, healthier runner.

 

 

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MINDFUL MONDAY: Do you stop when you run?

Posted by Danny Dreyer on Mon Oct 6th, 2014, 0 comments

I'm noticing a somewhat macho trend in fitness training in general, where it's fashionable to work yourself to exhaustion; where you're led to believe that if you don't "feel the burn" and give it everything you've got… that you just don't "Do It,"… as the Nike ad says. There is, of course, a lot to be said for building will power and challenging yourself to feel your limits. But, there's also a lot to be said for not taking yourself, or your running, too seriously.

 

 

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